Westword: Best Stage Art Denver, 2014

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Westword: Best Stage Art Denver, 2014

Featuring razor-sharp chompers, crimson shark lips and life-like grey skin, the shark stage proved the perfect complement to FaceMan's brand of ambitious rock and roll. Here's hoping FaceMan and his crew of creative geniuses find a way to top themselves this year. Maybe there's a way to build an accurate re-creation of the polar vortex...

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Marquee Magazine: FaceMan's 3rd Annual Waltz at The Bluebird Theater

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Marquee Magazine: FaceMan's 3rd Annual Waltz at The Bluebird Theater

The Third Annual FaceMan’s Waltz has become a staple at the Bluebird since it began three years ago. Joining FaceMan in the festivities will be a plethora of local musicians and bands including members of Lee Avenue, The Dendrites, The Knew, Mike Marchant, A. Tom Collins, Strange Americans, Wheelchair Sports Camp, Achille Lauro, Martin Gilmore, The Outfit, Hindershot, PANAL, Shady Elders, Indigenous Robot, Jesse Manley, Chris McGarry and the Insomniacs, The Raven and the Writing Desk, Safeboating is No Accident, Sawmill Joe, Vitamins, Scatter Gather, Go Star, Vox De Ville, Cop Circles, Boba Fett and the Americans, Bonnie and the Beard, Bonnie and the Clydes, Skeleton Show, Jacob Herold, Varlet and Space In Time. Just to name a few.

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McCormick Photos: Faceman + Talk Talk Talk

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McCormick Photos: Faceman + Talk Talk Talk

His music has an element of whimsical carelessness that I've always loved in musicians like Deer Tick, and the late Lou Reed.  Combined with a sense of altered rock n' roll, Faceman produces some of the newest sounds I've heard in a long time.  For the album art, I really wanted to show some of the struggle that Steve (Faceman) goes through when writing songs and performing.   

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The Larryville Chronicles: Our Chat With Denver's FaceMan: "We mostly play for my mom's bridge club."

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The Larryville Chronicles: Our Chat With Denver's FaceMan: "We mostly play for my mom's bridge club."

Denver rock-trio FaceMan is just plain strange, and we love 'em for it.  They are bringing their antics to LFK's Barnyard Beer this Thursday, Nov. 8, alongside locals Til Willis and Erratic Cowboy (re-read our recent political chat with Til over here prior to the election tomorrow!). 

Enjoy this chat with the FaceMan himself (with brief interjections from bandmates Dean and David) in which we discuss the band's evolution from masked oddballs to general oddballs, recording with music legends, dead dogs, and the difficulty of building a sweet bike jump. 

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Concerted Effort: Exclusive Song Release: FaceMan's "TalkTalkTalk"

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Concerted Effort: Exclusive Song Release: FaceMan's "TalkTalkTalk"

The earnestness of the vocals, even though there are only a few lines of lyrics used in this song, are a clear indication towards the self-reflective substance of FaceMan's music; even with the sparse words of this track in particular, thoughtfulness is still represented.  When a feeling and a reality can be conveyed in less words, I think that shows a mastery of the songwriting form, similarly to poetry or short fiction.  Keep your eyes out for more new material from this band 

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Clyfford Still Museum Blog: Locus Music Project

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Clyfford Still Museum Blog: Locus Music Project

After playing with FaceMan on the Museum’s forecourt on July 6, David Thomas Bailey proposed a locus composition and impromptu performance session inspired by the Museum’s architecture. Related to his work with The Locus Music Project, an initiative of the Colorado Composer Collective, the performance at the Museum included representatives from the bands invited to play at our two summer lawn concerts. (A performance of that composition can be seen in the video below.)

The Locus Music Project is an initiative of the Colorado Composer Collective. Members of the Collective write and perform new music inspired by iconic spaces in Denver. The project is intended to bring new art music to the community of Denver and present performances in unexpected places. Past performances have taken place at the Denver MCA, Confluence Park, and a moving piece across the Highlands Pedestrian Bridge. The most recent commission is for a short piece composed for the Brass Tree House performance space in the Baker neighborhood.

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Marquee Magazine: FaceMan releases new track 'TackleMeDown'

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Marquee Magazine: FaceMan releases new track 'TackleMeDown'

The song is dedicated to the memory of Phillip Bailey — the father of FaceMan guitarist David Bailey.
Bailey wrote The Marquee explaining how the song came about and the obvious parallels that the song drew to his own life, and his father’s final struggles against cancer.

My dad was a drummer that played loud, powerful music. If the music ever had a sensitive moment, my dad would figure some way to put some double bass hammers in there, or a super loud press roll. Funny to write about, but the music always felt visceral, which was a great and lively force in his music.

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Clyfford Still Museum Blog: FaceMan

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Clyfford Still Museum Blog: FaceMan

As we dig deeper into Clyfford Still’s work and learn more about the man himself, we see an independent spirit who pushed the boundaries of his medium to make new work. This spirit is not unlike those artists and independent musicians working in Denver today. We invited the band FaceMan, headlining our first lawn concert this Friday, to contribute to STILL LIFE. Faceman (Steve) and I sat down for an initial conversation, the excerpts of which can be found below. We will continue this conversation and share more thoughts from the band in future posts.

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CPR: Faceman's Feeding Time

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CPR: Faceman's Feeding Time

That’s how two world-famous New Orleans jazz bands -- The Dirty Dozen Brass Band and The Rebirth Brass Band -- both ended up on Faceman’s new album, which is called “Feeding Time.”

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Denver Post Reverb: Song Review - The Gospel

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Denver Post Reverb: Song Review - The Gospel

Behind all of that theatricality and grandeur, however, are FaceMan’s songs. Subtle, often simple and pathologically sincere, Steve’s tunes — not unlike those of the Band — resound in stark contrast to the group’s ostentatious performances.

“The Gospel” — our exclusive premiere from FaceMan’s as-yet-untitled third album, slated for release in 2013 — is a shimmering example. Recorded with Bryan Feuchtinger at Uneven Studios, the track includes contributions fromJulia Libassi (the Raven and the Writing Desk), Eric Johnston (the Outfit) and Neyla Pekarek (the Lumineers), but all of those cooks in the kitchen lead to a surprisingly subdued, sparse and moody tune. The centerpieces for this aural feast are Steve’s supplicating lyrics and his earnest vocal delivery. The effect — as the title suggests — is somber, soulful and hymn-like.

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Westword Review: FaceMan's Waltz at the Bluebird Theater, 2/3/12

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Westword Review: FaceMan's Waltz at the Bluebird Theater, 2/3/12

The sound became expansive and the stage felt crowded fairly early in FaceMan's set at theBluebird Theater on a snowy Friday night. After a brief introduction from the Flobots' Stephen "Brer Rabbit" Brackett and Wheelchair Sports Camp's Kalyn Heffernan, FaceMan's eponymous frontman (known by some as Steve) took the stage. After a couple of tunes with the band's core members -- guitarist David Thomas Bailey and drummer Dean Hirschfield -- the chaos begin.

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Marquee Magazine: FaceMan unveils his second waltz to introduce newest album Feedingtime

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Marquee Magazine: FaceMan unveils his second waltz to introduce newest album Feedingtime

“Bill” of the great film(s) Kill Bill said the reason Superman was his favorite superhero was because Superman wore the costume of Clark Kent to blend in with the human race.

In the climactic scene of the movie, as a truth serum dart shot from Bill’s gun pulses through “Beatrix Kiddo’s” veins, Bill waxes poetic on the subject, saying: “Superman didn’t become Superman. Superman was born Superman. When Superman wakes up in the morning, he’s Superman. His alter ego is Clark Kent. His outfit with the big red ‘S,’ that’s the blanket he was wrapped in as a baby when the Kents found him. Those are his clothes. What Kent wears — the glasses, the business suit — that’s the costume. That’s the costume Superman wears to blend in with us.”

While, in fact, nearly the opposite is true in reality for Faceman, I suspect that somewhere when “Steve” — the lead singer/songwriter and creative force behind the group — was born, that a part of Faceman already existed. His name, Steve, and the business suit he wears by day, is, like Kent, some sort of shield, in an attempt to blend in.

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Westword: FaceMan's Waltz: Listen to a track from the new record

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Westword: FaceMan's Waltz: Listen to a track from the new record

"As compared to our first release, the second album is much more of 'FaceMan on the attack,'" he offers. "We dig some trenches, but we're sprinting every chance we get. The first record, for the most part, was a folk album and was an accurate documentation of the beginning of the project. This record is folk musicians running on a hamster wheel. Ha! It feels like pent-up energy in a box. We can have a big sound and wanted to prove it. It's also meant to be collaborative, and we wanted to feature other musicians we believe in and are humbled by. Whatever it is, it was fun as hell to pull together."

Sounds like it.

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